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Would You Buy Chrysler Stock?

  
  
  
  

This week Chrysler announced that it could raise its financial targets for 2010 in the second half of the year and that it aims for a public offering of its stock "as quickly as possible." The new Chrysler Chief Executive Officer, Sergio Marchionne reported this on Monday, May 10th, and I think he impressed almost everyone with this announcement.

As far as I can tell, Chrysler stock has not been traded publicly since Cerebrus Capital Management bought the company in 2007 and made it privately-held. Back when it was a tradeable stock, the symbol was a "C", but that is now designated for Citibank. (What do you think the new symbol should be?)

So what's new on the horizon for Chrysler and will its stock be a good investment? Let's see, there's a new Jeep on the horizon - the all new 2010 Jeep Grand Cherokee, scheduled to arrive in June. It's expensive! A few thousand bucks over $30,000. But its the first and only new offering in 2010, manufacturered under Jeep's new ownership. And so far, reviews are good.

On the other hand, according to Reuters, "Chrysler has forecast negative cash flow of $1 billion for 2010 and earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization of between $2.5 billion to $2.7 billion. It expects to at least break even on an operating basis in 2010 and on a net level in 2011."

Breakeven doesn't give me warm and fuzzy feelings. But I'm rooting for you Chrysler. I want you do do well. I want the stock to be traded publicly. I want it to go up. I want stockholders to be happy. I want new Jeeps coming off the production line.

So, my question is this: Would you buy Chrysler stock? What is your prognosis for the future of Chrysler? Do you believe in it enough to own a piece of it? Oh wait, we DO own a piece of it. The US Government, and all its taxpayers actually own about 10% of the Chrysler Group. But whether I purchase my own personal shares or not, I'm rooting for you Chrysler!

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

Jeep Versus Hummer. Who will we hate now?

  
  
  
  

Boston Red Sox versus New York Yankees. Dogs versus Cats. Chocolate versus Vanilla. And Jeeps versus Hummers. As long as there have been civilian Jeeps and Hummers, there's been a rivalry. Often heated! One of the very first tee-shirts All Things Jeep produced was the "Hummer Recovery Vehicle" Tee. It was a best-seller, providing an accurate perspective of the off-road abilities of these two vehicles (as seen through the eyes of a Jeep dude.)

We sold a lot of these tees until the lawyers at GM contacted us one day and told us to stop selling them or else they would "take action". We were just a little Jeep company. We stopped selling them. But that was probably the first and last time Hummer ever bullied Jeep.

We've always enjoyed the debate, the name calling, the mockery. And the jokes about Hummers. Risque enough for us to not print them here! So, in honor of the passing of the Hummer, a small tribute. Hummer, we barely knew you. Which vehicle will Jeep owners hate now?

Best Jeep versus Hummer Debate Video

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DaVESDbCLqk

A lively debate from my friends at the Fun Times Guide.
Jeep versus Hummer

and an Actual Technical Review of a Jeep versus a Hummer

Rip Hummer. Long live JEEP.

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

Go Topless Day Update with All Things Jeep

  
  
  
  
Go Topless Day 2010 AllThingsJeep.com

Our plans for the Go Topless Day 2010 Worldwide Event for ALL Jeep Owners  really couldn't be going any better. Well, it could be going better. Oprah could have us on her show to discuss the benefits of going topless. Simon could tell everyone on American Idol that he was leaving the show to MC our Go Topless Day here in Lancaster. And Biden could have whispered "Go Topless Day is a big F***in Deal. But aside from all those wonderous possibilities, things are going good. Want to give you all an update. Kinda be the traffic director for the 2010 Go Topless Day Festivities. Just to make it fun, I'll do it in Q&A format.

Question: Is there a Go Topless Day Event happening in my neck of the woods?

Answer: There may be. There's about 50 Jeep clubs (and counting) signed up to participate in Go Topless Day 2010. The clubs or local groups are sponsoring picnics, trail rides, beach parties, barbeques, parades and more on May 8th 2010 - all over the world. Here is the whole list of participating Jeep Clubs Going Topless on May 8th 2010. If you are looking for an event to join, you may find one there.

Topless Jeeps on Go Topless Day 2009

We've also got a All Things Jeep Go Topless Day Facebook Page where the club activities are being listed (and you can post your own activities.)

Question: If I host some type of activity, can I get anything for free?

Answer: Always wanting something for free, eh? Sure you can! You tell us what you are doing and how many Jeep owners are showing up and we'll send you some bumper stickers, maybe a t-shirt, etc. In return, you gotta post a link on your website back to our Go Topless Day, okay? (contact email info @ allthingsjeep.com )

Question: Is there any contest or anything I can win?

Answer: Again with the free stuff? The answer is YES. We are having a Go Topless Day Photo Contest for GTD 2010 and you can win Gift Certificates to AllThingsJeep.com. And get your photos added to our historical record of Go Topless Days. Whoo-hoo.

Wanna check out some photos of our prior Go Topless Days? They are all right here in our glorious All Things Jeep Photo Album. Gotta say, some of those photos are priceless!

Question: Anything I can get for free just for reading this blog?

Answer: Absolutely. Would we let you down? Get a business sized envelope. Put a stamp on it. Address it to yourself. Fold it up and put it in another stamped envelope addressed to us at:

All Things Jeep
GTD Decal
2 Shaker Road, Unit F01
Shirley, MA 0464

We'll send you a beautiful GTD Bumper Sticker. Free.

Go Topless Day Bumper Sticker

Question: What if I want to spend my hard earned money on Go Topless Day Shirts?

Answer: Ok, that'd be great. Get yourself a Go Topless Day 2010 Limited Edition T-Shirt Here for just $10.  Buy 10+ and they go down to $8 each. Buy 25+ and they go down to $7 each.

Go Topless Day Shirts

Finally, The main page on our website that shares all the news about GTD is http://www.allthingsjeep.com/go-topless-day.html

We hope you'll join us on May 8th 2010 in celebrating the Jeep spirit. Whether you are topless on a beach, fully clothed at work, in a Jeep CJ5 at the ice cream stand, in a Jeep Liberty doing carpool, or crawling the local mountains in your XJ, take a moment to stand proud and remember, You are a JEEP OWNER. Ain't it great?

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

How many keys are on your keyring

  
  
  
  

Strattec Codeable Padlock for your JeepHow many keys are on your keyring? How big is that bulge in your pants pocket? How many times have you lost a key to one of your many locks? Depending upon the day, your answers may go like this. 13, big, five or six. So I was pretty stoked to come across this new product. The World's First Codeable Padlock by Strattec.

When you look at the packaging of this padlock, the first thing you notice is that there's no set of keys with the lock. That's because it uses one of your existing keys to unlock it. For most people, this key will be your ignition key. For me, it's the ignition key to my Jeep Wrangler.

After you open the Strattec Codeable Padlock packaging, you simply insert your ignition key into the lock, turn it a few times and the padlock "learns" your key and sets itself to be unlocked using your key. The more technical details follow, but basically this now means that you can buy a few of these padlocks, set them all to use your ignition key, and dramatically reduce the amount of keys you have to carry around (and potentially lose.)

My Jeep's key can now unlock the padlocks on the back of the All Things Jeep trailer, the lock on the trailer hitch, the metal toolbox in the back of the Jeep, the lock and chain I use to lock up our bikes, the lock on my metal locker at the gym. Well you get the idea.

At AllThingsJeep.com we sell the version that works with most all Jeep Keys and it's under $25. There are other versions available for other vehicle models too.

One key. Many locks. Pretty nifty, huh?

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

Falling in love again with the Jeep Wrangler Rubicon

  
  
  
  
 

"A perfect excuse to skip work and play", says LAWRENCE ULRICH in his review of the new 2010 Jeep Wrangler Rubicon. This review below is from the New York Times and is dated March 7th 2010. His review is titled:

A Very Old-School S.U.V. With Useful New Tricks

------------------------------------------------

WHAT IS IT? A four-door all-terrain conquistador.

HOW MUCH? Base price, $32,800; as tested, $35,975.

WHAT MAKES IT RUN? A 3.8-liter V-6 (202 horsepower, 237 pound-feet of torque); 6-speed manual or 4-speed automatic.

IS IT THIRSTY? Does a Jeep drink in the woods? The economy rating is just 15 m.p.g. in town and 19 on the highway.

ALTERNATIVES Land Rover LR2, Toyota FJ Cruiser.

REUNIONS are often a letdown, as anyone who's been reintroduced to a high-school flame can tell you. (Who is this psycho and why does she want to dance to "Lady in Red?")

So when a Jeep Wrangler appeared on my doorstep, I kept my expectations low. I had a serious crush on a Wrangler Sahara I owned in the '90s, but I was single and carefree then. The Jeep's kidney-shaking ride, intermittent heat and nearly useless back seat were all part of its charm.

I knew that the Wrangler was still around, doing its woodsy, back-road, ski- and beach-bum thing. But as with a Facebook "friend" from the old neighborhood, being aware of the Jeep's existence didn't mean I wanted to rekindle a relationship. But then it happened. After a 10-minute reintroduction to the Wrangler, I was ready to hightail it to the nearest mountain hideaway or find some muddy ruts to wallow in.

The Wrangler is as fun to drive as ever, even in unlikely places - like my cobbled Brooklyn street. And while "icon" is used loosely in the auto business, the Wrangler - like the VW Beetle or Mini Cooper - certainly is one.

The Jeep, of course, is a direct descendant of World War II military vehicles, and the Wrangler name can be carbon-dated to 1987. And from its school-bus-style manual shifter to its painted-metal interior and fold-down windshield, the Jeep's authenticity and stout, old-school feel could melt the hardest automotive heart.

In that vein, the Jeep makes trendy, boxy urban crossovers like the Kia Soul or Scion XB look as dweeby as a Dungeons and Dragons convention.

By Jeep standards, the addition for 2007 of the stretched four-door Unlimited model constituted a near revolution, adding a roomier, more accessible back seat. And while any Wrangler is a nearly unmatched off-roader, the Rubicon version - named for the fearsome off-road trail in the Sierra Nevada - is the hardest of the hard-core. It adds a two-speed transfer case with a burly low-range gear ratio, steel-plate underbody armor and rock rails; electric locking for the front and rear axles; an electronic sway-bar disconnect; and knobby 32-inch off-road tires.

If you find yourself conversing with off-road types - perhaps when they're rescuing your "crossover S.U.V." from a slushpile - you may hear them refer to their Jeeps' "breakover and departure angles." These gents are referring to the Wrangler's short body overhangs, which, combined with 10.5-inch ground clearance, let the Wrangler climb and descend incredibly steep obstacles.

A standard Hill Start Assist feature keeps the Jeep from rolling back on steep grades; optional electronic trailer-sway assist helps to ensure that jet skis and dirt bikes don't perform tricks before they reach their destination.

The Jeep's Freedom Top is another recent development. The three-piece modular hardtop features two front overhead panels that can be quickly removed and stored on board. A more complex disassembly removes the entire roof cap (along with the doors if you like) for the full naked-Jeep effect. Adding the dual-top option lets you pop the hardtop and unfurl a fabric top over the exposed roof bars. (A softtop with a built-in sunroof is also available.)

These and other changes have made the Jeep just civilized enough, but not so much that its rough vitality is lost. There's an optional touch-screen navigation system, satellite radio, Bluetooth capability and a hard drive for music.

The steering still feels truckish and slack, yet pleasingly mechanical: like its brethren dating back a half-century or more, the Jeep makes you feel alive and attuned to every sensation. That's both compliment and criticism: once my nostalgic glow subsided, I had to admit that the Wrangler is not everyone's cup of jittering tea. The ride is noisy and jouncy, it's a taxing climb in and out and the reliability record is poor.

I'll admit two other things. First, I had no idea that the Wrangler could reach $36,000. Second, I would never pay 36 grand for a Wrangler.

But with a two-door Wrangler Sport 4x4 starting at $21,915, the Jeep remains a dream date for the young - a perfect excuse to skip work and play.

LAWRENCE ULRICH Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

2010 Jeep Wrangler Review

  
  
  
  

Give Dan Neil, from the LA Times a hand for writing such a "right on" article. I especially like this line:

"You know how penguins are awkward out of the water and once they dive in become ballistic torpedoes? Like that."

His email is posted below if you want to send him a note.

Reprinted in full, below, from the Los Angeles Times:

By Dan Neil

December 11, 2009

In November, during a marathon eight-hour press conference I'm delighted to have missed, Fiat Chairman Sergio Marchionne outlined how Fiat and its new corporate holding Chrysler would collaborate on future products.

It comes down to this: Fiat will build compact cars for Chrysler. Chrysler will build mid-size and large vehicles for Fiat. And both companies will sell in the other's home markets.

From now on it's the Fiat-Chrysler Italian-American Friendship Society. Shiny suits for everybody. Fuggetaboutit.

And in all those dreary death-by-PowerPoint hours, in all that chatter about synergy and shared architecture and homologation (whatever that is), you know whose name was never called? Jeep Wrangler.

According to Fiat-Chrysler's five-year plan, the Wrangler will get a long-overdue diesel engine option at the end of 2010, and make some concessions to fuel economy (a start-stop system) and creature comforts (a restyled interior). But otherwise, the Italian bosses are going to leave the old donkey alone.

Other Jeeps? Sure, why not. Fiat can build the next generation of Jeep Patriot or Compass on an all-wheel-drive Fiat Panda chassis and lose nothing in translation because those fraudulent nebbishes are about as Jeep as I am a great Italian tenor.

But the Wrangler -- a stumpy, clumsy, body-on-frame clodhopper, as hopelessly out-of-date as it is unbeatable off-road -- is the heart and soul of the brand. The Italians are justly famous for their cultural antennae, and I think it served them well here. They appreciate the semiotic enterprise of Wrangler, which speaks to a kind of four-wheel American primitivism: nativist, nationalist, armadillo-eating, off-grid, off-road, mil-spec.

You can't alloy Wrangler, you can only anneal it, which is to say, make it harder.

Take our test car, for instance. The Rubicon-package Wrangler Unlimited is full of drop-forged orneriness, starting with a couple of bigger-badder Dana 44 axles with electronic locking differentials; a two-speed transfer case with extra tall gearing; and electronic front sway bar disconnect, which will give you a little more wheel articulation when you're driving over, say, a Honda Accord.

Rock rails, skid plates and various other bits under undercarriage armor protect the body and chassis.

Unlike most other off-roaders, the Jeep retains the old-style, manually engaged transfer case, and let me tell you, it ain't smooth. To stick it in Low Range 4x4, I really had to muscle the lever in the gate.

There are some nice electronic additions to the Wrangler -- hill-start assist, which keeps the vehicle from rolling back on a hill as you put it in gear -- but the vibe of this vehicle is very mechanical, very unreformed. Old school, thy name is Wrangler.

Also, unlike a Porsche Cayenne or Land Rover LR4 -- whose onboard computers and electro-hydraulic differentials do a lot of the off-roading work for the driver -- the Wrangler requires more driving skill, lest you bury it to the axles in mud, which I almost did.

Under the latched hood is Jeep's 3.8-liter, 202-hp V-6, a unit that has approximately the refinement of a Soviet-era wheat thresher, buttoned to a similarly antiquated four-speed automatic. Shod with a set of howling 255/75, 17-inch mudders, the Unlimited -- that's what they call the model with four doors -- is a lolling, keel-showing, dead-slow mess on asphalt. There's no acceleration, unintended or otherwise. Hustled down a winding mountain road, the Wrangler handles like it's been drinking bug spray.

But then it goes off-road and suddenly, as if a special kind of gravity ensues, the Wrangler is transformed. Everything that seemed misguided or badly arranged suddenly makes perfect sense.

The ratty iron-block engine that huffed and puffed on the freeway is now purring along at 1,200 rpm, making just enough torque to climb a rutted timber road, without churning the mud. The gear ratios are perfect. The bedspring suspension -- which seemed to threaten to throw you out the driver's window -- now terrain-follows with an eerie suppleness.

You know how penguins are awkward out of the water and once they dive in become ballistic torpedoes? Like that.

Our test vehicle was up-fitted with what's called the Preferred Package 24R, including the removable plastic hardtop. The two small panels over the front seats come off without much trouble, but you will need Pharaoh's slaves to get the larger part off.

If you've got an afternoon to kill, you can also take the doors off, which is a pretty good trick, considering they have power windows and locks.

Be advised, however, that riding around town in a doorless, open-air Jeep Wrangler sends, well, signals. You've got to own that look.

The Wrangler -- still built in Toledo, Ohio, using more or less the same cartwrighting and blacksmithing as ever -- is about as pure an expression of brand and country as can be imagined.

The only comparable product would be Harley-Davidson. Both Jeep and Harley are, by many measures, fairly antiquated products.

Some of the Jeep's textures are downright hilarious, including the 30 miles of electrical tape used to wrap up loose ends on the wiring harness, or the webbed-nylon check straps holding the doors on, or the crude stamped-steel brackets that hold the seats to the floor. I've seen license plates with more commitment to craft.

But the Wrangler is a pure, expressive product, full of history and meaning, designed to do one job fantastically well. I regard it as the last American Chrysler. Long may it wave.

dan.neil@latimes.com

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

What happens when your hero is gone?

  
  
  
  

Norman Wnuk, founder and CEO of www.AllThingsJeep.com passed away last week, from a massive, unexpected, heart attack. He was 44. He was my husband. He was the founder of our business we ran together for 7 years. He was passionate about his love of Jeeps, his love of AMC Pacers (yes, I know, hard to explain that one), his love of creating & building things, his love of learning, his love of our business, and his love of his friends and family.

I don't want this blog article to be an obituary, but I feel the need to post my thoughts and put them out there in the world. So read on if you'd like, and shut down this window if you desire.

The reason I fell in love with Norman was because he was so passionate about learning and about doing well at the things that interested him. He comes from a family of business owners and after years of working for big companies, he knew the right thing for him, professionally & emotionally, was to build his own business. I came along for the ride. And it's been a ride. We used to argue with a friend of ours who also has an internet business. Our friend didn't really have any interest in the product he sold, he just enjoyed the business aspect of things. Norman, on the other hand, has been an avid off-roader & Jeeper for 20 years. He wanted to start a business that his heart was in, something he loved and was passionate about. The business person in him saw the opportunity on-line in e-commerce, and thus All Things Jeep was born.

Like most small businesses, we have struggled over the years. Will this work? Or will it fail? We have made our share of mistakes. But we've learned from them. We've worked harder than I ever thought possible, compromising many things in our lives and giving up a lot to grow and nurture our business. We are so attached to it. It is a part of us and our customers are a part of us. It is incredibly rewarding when we hear from our customers and we've made them happy.

Norman inspired me to set a goal and work to reach it, in spite of obstacles. He taught me to reach my limit, and then go beyond it. He made me realize that a commitment to something means doing whatever it takes. And we've always agreed that our customers are the most important part of our business.

My heart is pretty much breaking as I write this, but I wanted to share with our customers and anyone else who comes across this blog, that his live, which was way too short, ended when he was feeling good about reaching his goal of creating and running a successful small business. That was a giant dream of his. And he achieved it. And it IS because of our awesome customers. He died extremely satisfied with what he had achieved. (Of course, his Pacer restoration is not complete, but I know one of the 17 other AMC Pacer fans in the world will come forward and volunteer to finish the restoration!) Norman's life wasn't a flame that went out, but I think it was a spark that will keep many other flames alive. That's what he would want. And that's what he will get. Here he is in the CJ8, ready to overcome every obstacle that gets in his way.

Norman Wnuk & his '83 Jeep Scrambler 

Norman, looking like the typical, young business owner.

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

Jeep Jamboree USA 2010 Schedule Announced

  
  
  
  

JeepJam announced their 2010 Jamboree schedule yesterday and true to form, I want to go to all of them!

You can find the entire Jeep Jamboree 2010 Schedule Here.

This year, our closest Jamboree is up in Bethel, Maine, a beautiful location, especially in the fall. Last month, Norman, the President of AllthingsJeep.com and Mike, in Customer Service went up to that event. There were some pretty heavy downpours on the 2nd day and the Jeep came home muddier than I've ever seen it. ('83 CJ8) In the New England woods, the trail is narrow, the rocks are moss-covered and the rain makes everything slippery. So it's quite a wheelin' adventure.

We know Jeep Jamborees are a luxury expense. Not a necessity ('though some may argue) and with finances tight, the folks over there at JJUSA have come up with some "family plans" that help make these adventures more affordable. Besides, family time together is a great thing (just ask my teenage daughter.) Kidding aside, she loved it when we did a Jamboree last summer.

Excepted from their website:

"In an effort to make Jeep Jamborees more affordable for the 2010 season, we're offering a Family Plan for both Classic and Just Trails Jamborees. The price per vehicle for Classic events is $600, while Just Trails Jamborees are only $450. The fine print: Two adults and two or three children (12 and under) are required per vehicle.

Another opportunity for Jeep fanatics on a budget is the Trails Only option, which is offered to a limited number of registrants (first come, first served) at each Jeep Jamboree USA event (due to lack of facilities this offer does not apply to the Palo Duro or Rubicon Trail Jeep Jamboree events). Trails Only participants enjoy all of the usual Jamboree amenities (including the Saturday evening prize drawing) but provide all their own meals.

In addition, active members of the Armed Forces will receive a 15 percent discount on all Jamborees. The Buy 3 Get 1 FREE promotion will be continued in 2010, with only adult passengers eligible for this offer. And we're bringing back the dash plaques! Each registered Jeep vehicle will again include a dash plaque.

Remember December 1st is the opening registration date for the 2010 season. We look forward to seeing you on the trail."

Photos of our Jeep Jamboree Adventure on the Rubicon Trail

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

I live I ride I am Jeep Tagline

  
  
  
  

So, whatcha think? Do you like Chrysler's new tagline for Jeep?

I Live. I Ride. I Am. Jeep. I Live I Ride I Am Jeep

How about their new commercials. If you haven't see it, you can catch one here. This one is called "Clocks" 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PIEBVDCNK28

I don't like it. Not even a little bit. (says Jean, from www.AllThingsJeep.com.) Here's my list of complaints.

1. I DO live, so they got me there, but I don't understand the relevance.

2. I DON'T ride. I DRIVE. I do ride a lot of things - horses, bicycles, amusement park rides. But my Jeep's not one of them. And if I'm riding in a Jeep, then I'm the passenger, and what fun is that?

3. I AM? Huh? What am I? A Jeep?

This whole ad compaign reminds me of those old Ad-Libs (remember those?) and makes we want to fill in the blanks. "I LIVE at 2 Shaker Road in Shirley. I RIDE my bike to work sometimes. I AM a mom, photographer, Jeep owner.

I know these type of ads are about branding, and evoking a feeling in us about the Jeep brand. (Remember, your brand isn't what You think about your company, it's about what your Customers think of your company) But this doesn't really evoke positive feelings about Jeep. It evokes feelings like I should be working but instead I'm watching the clock to when work is over and then I can go drive (not ride) my Jeep.  Hey, maybe that's the point?

So what do you think? What tagline would you create for Jeep if Chrsyler was giving you hundreds of thousands of dollars to create a tagline and ad campaign for them? Post your ideas here. I'll give a set of 10 Jeep decals (your choice) to the person whose idea I like best. (I'll give you until Nov 16th to post.) And hey, maybe Chrsyler will read this and hire you to be their next marketing genius!

If you want to read the whole story behind this branding campaign and what the campaign will look like over the next year, check out the details here. It's the "Official" document and it's pretty interesting.

Jeep Branding Philosophy

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.

JPFreek Magazine & United Four Wheel Drive Associations Announcement

  
  
  
  

I am really proud to say that the publishers of my favorite Off-Road Publication, JPFreek Adventure Magazine, and United Four Wheel Drive Association, (an association of Jeep associations!) are doing great things for the Jeep & off-road community with their new partnership. Just got this press release sent over to me. I'm going to post it, in full, below. Then I'll add a few links so you can check out their sites.
--------------------------------------------------------

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

United Four Wheel Drive Associations & JPFreek Adventure Magazine Create Publishing Partnership

JPFreek to Commence Publication of The Voice for United Four Wheel Drive Associations

Beaverton, OR - 11/3/2009 - United Four Wheel Drive Associations today announced a partnership with JPFreek Adventure Magazine to produce and publish The Voice, the official magazine of United Four Wheel Drive Associations, as an engaging quarterly digital publication focused on off-highway and outdoor recreation as well as responsible land use.

The new partnership is a first for both organizations and will allow United Four Wheel Drive Associations to broaden its distribution scope by digitizing their previous hardcopy edition of The Voice.  In addition, the partnership will expand the subscription base for JPFreek Adventure Magazine to an additional 11,000 subscribers as part of the current membership package for United Four Wheel Drive Associations. 

JPFreek Adventure Magazine founders Frank Ledwell and Richard Tinnell will assume the roles of Editor-in-Chief & Creative Director, respectively, for The Voice.  Wayne Groom, President of United Four Wheel Drive Associations, said of the partnership, "We are excited about the opportunity of this partnership as it will allow us to continue to enhance the quality and distribution of our primary communication with the off- highway enthusiast, allowing us to reach out beyond our current membership." 

Frank Ledwell, Editor & Publisher of JPFreek Adventure Magazine, said of the partnership, "Partnering with United Four Wheel Drive Associations in creating The Voice is exciting for JPFreek and our entire staff.  Our passion for Jeep and outdoor adventure has been a huge part of JPFreek Adventure Magazine's success, and our value set of promoting responsible off-highway and outdoor adventure recreation compliments our goals in establishing The Voice as a highly credible and engaging publication."

The partnership will work to bring the entire off-highway community together by broadening the scope and importance of engaging off-highway enthusiasts to become involved in various land access issues.  In addition, added value for all business partners and sponsors of both United Four Wheel Drive Associations and JPFreek Adventure Magazine will be achieved through cross-branding efforts and other significant promotional and marketing efforts. 

This partnership is effective immediately with the new issue of The Voice slated for release by January 15, 2010. 

About JPFreek Adventure Publications, LLC

JPFreek Adventure Magazine was developed in March 2006 with the express intent of sharing a passion for Jeep vehicles and outdoor adventure with fellow enthusiasts, all while promoting eco-friendly and responsible off-highway recreation. JPFreek's staff takes pride in delivering a fun, vibrant, and engaging digital Jeep® adventure publication that is the only one of its kind in North America.

About United Four Wheel Drive Associations

United Four Wheel Drive Associations is an Association of Associations formed to act as a voice for the off-highway community for land access issues.  From avid enthusiasts who are individual members, to clubs and association members, the membership of UFWDA spans four continents with over 10,000 member voices.

Written & Sponsored by www.AllThingsJeep.com and its employees.
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